Canola Counts survey

Canola Counts survey overview

The Canola Counts survey tool was developed by the Canola Council of Canada with support from Alberta Canola, SaskCanola and the Manitoba Canola Growers. It was built to help drive the adoption of plant establishment assessments while tracking progress towards canola industry production goals.

Many canola fields are still averaging 50 to 60 per cent emergence, which means that of every 10 seeds planted, four to five of them fail to emerge and contribute to yield. Conducting plant establishment assessments in every field, every year, will help identify plant establishment challenges and strengths, and can lead to yield improvements for canola growers.

For more information about canola plant establishment or assessing plant stands, visit the plant establishment section of the Canola Encyclopedia.

The Canola Counts maps were created from crowd-sourced data collected through the Canola Counts survey tool at CanolaCounts.ca. Contributors are encouraged to take multiple plant counts (at the 2-4 leaf stage or later in spring, and after harvest in fall) and submit the average plant density for each field. They also had the option of submitting average plant emergence values (directly or as the product of input seeding rate, thousand seed weight (TSW) and plant density values).


Emergence

(Updated for Spring 2021)

Plant density

(Updated for Spring 2021)


Alberta and B.C. Peace

This map includes data from locations within the canola growing region of Alberta and the B.C. Peace River region (in the northeast corner of B.C.).

While most of Alberta had low soil moisture reserves going into seeding in 2021, timely rains meant that many canola acres emerged with decent initial moisture. Frosts in late May and early June caused damage to recently emerged canola, though the earlier frost hit before actual emergence for many acres in the central Alberta and Peace River regions.

There appeared to be less spring flea beetle pressure in southern Alberta compared to previous years, though there were fields across the province that saw feeding damage above thresholds.

As spring progressed, dry conditions in the Peace River region and southern Alberta persisted, expanding to include much of central Alberta. The whole province saw exceptional heat and dry conditions after establishment which is expected to impact yield and time to maturity.

For more details on weather conditions in this region, see these Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada maps and for additional crop details, see the Alberta crop report.


Saskatchewan

Spring conditions in the canola growing region of Saskatchewan started with good soil moisture, but some areas experienced dry seedbed conditions.  As a result, some growers increased seeding depth in an attempt to seed into moisture. Most areas received rain after seeding, some of which was rapid and forceful and caused emergence issues, especially for deeper seeded fields.

Overall numbers of spring flea beetles seemed to be lower than previous years, although there were still heavily infested pockets through the province.

The whole province saw exceptional heat and dry conditions after establishment which is expected to impact yield and maturity.

For more details on weather conditions in this region, see these Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada maps and for additional crop details, see the Saskatchewan crop report.


Manitoba

A dry, open spring in in the canola growing region of Manitoba allowed farmers an early start on seeding. Dry conditions continued through most of May, along with cool soil temperatures, delaying canola germination and emergence. Farmers were left with the decision of whether to wait to plant their canola into warmer conditions or to seed deeper to place the seed into moisture. 

A timely May long weekend rain across the province allowed for early seeded crops to emerge just in time for a severe late May frost.  This frost event resulted in many acres being resown and created further variability amongst plant stands. Later-seeded crops emerged during an early June heat wave which saw temperatures well above 35oC. This heat, coupled with high winds and low soil moisture reserves, caused significant plant stress and slowed crop growth and development.

The slow growth and stress on the crop allowed for flea beetles to get a jump on the crop. Variable plant populations were seen across the province because of a combination of environmental extremes. For more details on weather conditions in this region, see these Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada maps and for additional crop details, see the Manitoba crop report.


Gallery

2021 – Spring

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