• Green blues. By October, getting crop off becomes the priority. Green seed is unlikely to turn anymore unless a lot of moisture (snow?) comes, in which case harvest may be delayed until spring. Cool days, but hot bins. Canola binned hot will retain that heat for weeks and likely months, with the risk of storage losses rising with each passing…
    Read more
  • Lower temperatures and shortened days in the fall trigger perennials such as Canada thistle, dandelion and quack grass to start moving sugars to below-ground tissues. Winter annuals and biennials are also doing this, but they don’t need a cool temperature trigger. Spraying these weeds in fall takes advantage of this downward flow, providing better control for next year. Read more…
    Read more
  • Take fall samples when soil temperatures drop below 10°C, or cooler. Because microbial processes in the soil slow down as temperatures cool, sampling late in the fall will provide a close representation of nutrient levels at seeding next spring. The cooler the better when sampling, but you want to make sure you can still get the probe down 24”. Submit…
    Read more
  • Discovery of a different clubroot pathotype in central Alberta will change the rotation plans for some growers. No current varieties have resistance to this different pathotype, and varieties with a new effective source of resistance will not be available for at least the next year or two, or maybe longer. Longer rotation is necessary to slow the pathogen shift that…
    Read more
  • The 2014 Canola Discovery Forum at TCU Place in Saskatoon October 22-23 is a golden opportunity for growers, researchers, agronomists, and representatives from seed and equipment companies to exchange key insights and leading-edge ideas for the sustainable and profitable production of canola. The agenda includes thought-provoking speakers and lots of time for discussion. The forum’s goal is to bring forward…
    Read more