Growing Forward 1 & 2 - Project Listing

GROWING FORWARD (2009-2013)

You can jump to a theme or project using the links below.

 

Canola/Flax Canadian Agri-Science Cluster

Theme 1: Oil Nutrition

  • Canola Oil Multi-Centre Intervention Trial (COMIT)
  • Effect of Canola Oil as Part of a Low Glycemic Load Diet on Glucose Control and Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetes
  • Effects of Canola Oil Fatty Acid Composition on Insulin Resistance and Obesity
  • Effects of Canola Oil on Blood Vessel Function in Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD)

Theme 2: Meal Nutrition

  • Maximize Use of Canola Meal in High Value Dairy Feeds
  • High Inclusion Levels of Regular and High Energy Canola Meal in Animal Feeds
  • Improving Carbohydrate Composition of Canola Meal to Increase Energy Content

Theme 3: Crop Establishment

  • Management practices for optimum canola emergence
  • Impact of management and environment on canola establishment based on survey data
  • Enhancing canola emergence with innovative stubble management practices and use of crop establishment aids
  • Improving canola establishment and uniformity across various soil-climatic zones of Western Canada
  • Farm gate investigation of best management practices in canola establishment and production systems
  • Factors influencing canola emergence

Theme 4: Crop Nutrition

  • Improving nutrient management in canola and canola-based cropping systems
  • Enhancing nitrogen management for canola production: addressing field, spatial and temporal variability with in-crop variable rate applications of nitrogen fertilizer
  • Nitrogen dynamics
  • Phosphorous fertilizer and canola oil analyses

Theme 5: Crop Protection

  • Facilitating the delivery of practical sclerotinia stem rot risk forecasts based on improved assessment of canola petal infestation
  • Weather-based assessment of sclerotinia stem rot risk
  • Defining populations of the L. maculans pathogen in test sites used for canola blackleg resistance trials
  • Mitigation of risk to canola from spring flea beetle injury

Theme 6: Harvest Management

  • Evaluation of on-farm harvest losses in canola across Western Canada
  • Developing methods to estimate pod drop and pod shatter in canola

Theme 7: Storage Management

  • Storage and handling characteristics of new varieties of high oil content canola
  • Feasibility of bag storage system for canola under prairie conditions

Theme 8: Integrated Crop Management

  • Integrated crop management systems for wild oat control
  • Improved integrated crop management with beneficial insects
  • Input study and recovery
  • Legumes before canola

Theme 9: Sustainability

  • Determining arthropod biodiversity in canola cropping systems as a key to improved sustainability of production
  • Economic profitability and sustainability of canola production systems in Western Canada
  • The environmental footprint of canola and canola-based products
  • Evaluation of adaptability and ecological performance of Brassica juncea canola in diverse growing environments
  • Exploring the ecological impact of canola-inclusive cropping systems in Western Canada
  • Consistent and environmentally sound canola production
  • Canola biodiesel sustainability
  • Detection, surveillance and management of weed, insect and disease pests that threaten the economic viability of crop production and the environmental health of prairie agro-ecosystems
  • Top Canola Grower survey

 

SaskCanola – Developing Innovative Agri-Products (DIAP)

  • Activity 1: Development of sclerotinia resistant Brassica napus lines and molecular markers for marker-assisted breeding
  • Activity 2: Improving the durability of resistance to blackleg in Brassica napus using the novel LepR4 gene
  • Activity 3: Transfer of pod shatter resistance from yellow seeded B. napus and B. juncea to canola
  • Activity 4: Development of molecular genetic resources for Camelina sativa an alternative oilseed for the Prairies

 

GROWING FORWARD 2 (2013-2018)

You can jump to a theme or project using the links below.

 

Canola Agri-Science Cluster: Partnership for an Innovative and Competitive Industry

Theme 1: Oil Nutrition

  • Canola Oil Multi-Centre Intervention Trial (COMIT II)
  • Canola Oil Enriched Mediterranean Type Weight Loss Diet in Type 2 Diabetes

Theme 2: Meal Nutrition

  • Maximizing Use of Canola Meal in Dairy Diets
  • High Inclusion Levels of Regular and High Energy Canola Meal in Monogastric Rations
  • Canola Meal Quality Survey
  • Canola Meal Processing

Theme 3: Canola Health & Integrated Pest Management

  • Characterization and development of new resistant sources for sustainable management of clubroot in canola
  • The host-pathogen interaction of Plasmodiophora brassicae and canola
  • Management of clubroot in a dynamic environment
  • Clubroot surveillance and epidemiology: Staying ahead of an important canola issue
  • Aster yellows and Swede midge – new threats to prairie canola production
  • Development of pest management decision-making protocols for the Swede midge in canola
  • Improved integrated crop management with beneficial insects

Theme 4: Canola Yield & Quality Optimization

  • Seed size and seeding rate effects on canola yield and quality
  • Variable N fertility management of canola at the field scale, based on analysis of yield maps and spatial and statistical variability of soil test N and P
  • Investigating tolerance of canola genotypes to heat and drought stresses, and root traits estimation by electrical capacitance
  • Feasibility of bag storage system for canola storage system for canola storage under Prairie conditions (Extension GF1-3.5.2)
  • On-Farm Canola Storage in Large Bins

Theme 5: Integrated Crop Management & Sustainability of Canola Production

  • Canola sustainability - risk mitigation
  • Canola rotation studies - canola, cereal (corn), soy (oilseed)
  • The environmental footprint of canola and canola-based products (extension of GF1-3.7.3)
  • Economic profitability and sustainability of canola project (extension of GF1-3.7.2)

Theme 6: Canola Supply Surveillance & Forecasting

  • Operational models to forecast canola growth stage, Sclerotinia risk, and yield in Western Canada.

Theme 7: Science Cluster Tech Transfer

  • Canola Research Hub: Top Science for the Bottom Line

 

AIP – P032 Canola Disease Management Tools for the Prairies - Blackleg and Sclerotinia

  • Activity 2: Improving canola resistance against blackleg disease through incorporation of novel resistance genes sourced from B. napusB. rapa and B. oleracea.
  • Activity 3 - Identifying novel resistance genes from canola relatives and developing canola germplasm with multiple resistance genes sourced from B. nigraB. juncea, and B. carinata.
  • Activity 4: Genome-wide association mapping of quantitative resistance against blackleg in Brassica napus.
  • Activity 5: Transcriptomic analysis of the Leptosphaeria maculans- (blackleg-canola) interaction to identify resistance genes in canola and avirulence factors in L. maculans.
  • Activity 6 - Durable blackleg resistance stewardship through knowledge of blackleg pathogen population, resistance genes and crop sequence towards the development of a cultivar rotation program in the Prairie Provinces.
  • Activity 7: Investigating the Resistance (R-gene) durability of canola cultivars and emergence of virulent blackleg isolates in farmers’ fields.
  • Activity 8 - Rapid field diagnostics of the blackleg pathogen races through the identification of pathogen avirulence (Avr) genes and the development of Avr-specific markers.
  • Activity 9 - Development of a blackleg yield loss model and assessment of fungicide resistance in western Canadian populations of Leptosphaeria maculans.
  • Activity 10 - Characterization of defense genes underlying quantitative resistance loci (QRL) to Sclerotinia stem rot in Asian Brassica napus and transfer of resistance to Canadian spring type canola.
  • Activity 11 - Resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum necrosis inducing proteins in canola.

 

In Pursuit of 52 by 2025 - Agriscience Project

  • Identification and genetic mapping of Brassica napus for resistance to pathotype 5X of Plasmodiophora brassicae
  • Understanding the mechanisms for race-specific and non-specific resistance for effective use of cultivar resistance against blackleg of canola in Western Canada
  • Characterization of the new strains of the clubroot pathogen in Alberta
  • Using SNP markers to assess genetic variability of Plasmodiophora brassicae in Canada.
  • Integrated approaches for flea beetle control – Economic thresholds, prediction models, landscape effects and natural enemies

 

Theme 1 – Oil Nutrition

 

1.1.1 Canola Oil Multi-Centre Intervention Trial (COMIT)

Objective: To examine how the consumption of different dietary oils affects a broad range of metabolic responses that are important in the development of cardiovascular diseases. This study will examine the relationship between dietary oil consumption and arterial function, blood fat content, and blood markers of cardiovascular disease risk. Additionally, the efficiency of the body in converting fat from dietary oils into other specific fat compounds with known health benefits will be examined. Also, the correlation between psychosocial parameters and vascular function will be studied.

Research Team: Dr. Peter Jones (University of Manitoba) – Principal Investigator, Dr. David Jenkins (University of Toronto), Dr. Benoît Lamarche (Laval University), Drs. Penny-Kris-Etherton and Sheila West (Penn State)

 

1.2.1. Effect of Canola Oil as Part of a Low Glycemic Load Diet on Glucose Control and Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetes

Objective: Large observational studies have shown cereal fiber and low glycemic load diets to protect from diabetes and heart disease. The use of low glycemic load diets containing healthy fats (i.e. canola oil) and low glycemic index foods still remains to be established. This research aims to build on these earlier findings by establishing canola oil as an effective means to lower the glycemic load of the diet and establish its health benefits.

Research Team: Drs. David Jenkins and Cyril Kendall (University of Toronto)

 

1.2.2 Effects of Canola Oil Fatty Acid Composition on Insulin Resistance and Obesity

Objective: The objective of this research is to investigate the effects of canola oil and its fatty acid composition for prevention and treatment of insulin resistance, inflammation and obesity using a rodent model of diet-induced obesity. This research will fill an important gap in knowledge regarding the effects of canola oil for the prevention and management of insulin resistance, inflammation and obesity.

Research Team: Drs. Carla Taylor and Peter Zahradka (Canadian Centre for Agri-food Research in Health and Medicine)

 

1.2.3 Effects of Canola Oil on Blood Vessel Function in Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD)

Objective: Several types of studies indicate that dietary fatty acid composition modulates blood vessel function, but there have been no studies focussing on canola oil. The objective of this study is to assess the effects of canola oil consumption on blood vessel function in both acute and chronic (8 week) studies with healthy participants and individuals with PAD.

Research Team: Drs. Carla Taylor and Peter Zahradka (Canadian Centre for Agri-food Research in Health and Medicine)

 

Theme 2 – Meal Nutrition

 

2.1.1 Maximize Use of Canola Meal in High Value Dairy Feeds

Objective: This is a multi-institution co-ordinated series of studies looking at protein, amino acid and energy metabolism influencing milk production and composition. The end objective is to provide information about canola meal amino acid utilization by dairy cows to feed industry nutritionists so that it can be accurately formulated into dairy cow diets.

Research Team: Dr. Tim Mutsvangwa (University of Saskatchewan ), Dr. Ed DePeters (University of California Davis), Dr. David Schingoethe, (South Dakota State University), Dr. Lou Armentano (University of Wisconsin), Dr. Hélène Lapierre (AAFC Sherbrooke)

 

2.2.1 High Inclusion Levels of Regular and High Energy Canola Meal in Animal Feeds

Objective: The objective of this research is to fully investigate the practical feeding of canola juncea meal. Some aspects of this evaluation include: high inclusion levels in swine and poultry diets, enzyme work in poultry diets, and ensuring that canola juncea meal still meets the nutritional needs for ruminants despite the lower fibre content.

Research Team: Drs. Ruurd Zjilstra and Eduardo Beltranena (University of Alberta), Drs. Bogdan Slominski and Martin Nyachoti (University of Manitoba ), Dr. Derek Anderson, (Nova Scotia Agricultural College), Dr. Tim McAllister (AAFC Lethbridge)

 

2.2.2 Improving Carbohydrate Composition of Canola Meal to Increase Energy Content

Objective: To determine what the important energy yielding and energy detracting carbohydrate components of canola meal are with the objective of providing information to canola breeders to develop high energy canola varieties.

Research Team: Dr. Gerhard Rakow (AAFC Saskatoon), Dr. Bogdan Slominski (University of Manitoba)

 

Theme 3 – Crop Establishment

 

3.1.1 Management practices for optimum canola emergence

Objective: To determine critical seeding factors that affect canola stand establishment.

Research Team: Dr. Bob Blackshaw (AAFC Lethbridge) – Principal Investigator; Drs. Mike Bevans, Blanie Metzger and Lawrence Papworth (AGTech Centre, Lethbridge); Dr. Neil Harker (AAFC, Lacombe); Dr. Eric Johnson (AAFC Scott); Dr. Randy Kutcher (AAFC Melfort); Dr. Byron Irvine (AAFC Brandon); CCC Agronomy Specialists

 

3.1.2 Impact of management and environment on canola establishment based on survey data

Objective: To conduct a field survey of randomly selected canola fields to provide a complete and unbiased assessment of crop stands in the Prairie Provinces, a first for this type of critical assessment. To determine the impact of the environment, management and weeds on crop establishment.

Research Team: Julia Leeson (AAFC, Saskatoon) – Principal Investigator; Dr. Christoph Neeser (AARD Brooks)

 

3.1.3 Enhancing canola emergence with innovative stubble management practices and use of crop establishment aids

Objective: To enhance canola establishment by manipulating stubble height and use of companion crops to assist with canola emergence from a deeper depth.

Research Team: Dr. Aaron Glen (AAFC Brandon) – Principal Investigator; Drs. William May and Guy Lafond (AAFC Indian Head); Dr. Herb Cutforth (AAFC Swift Current); Dr. Paul Bullock (University of Manitoba); Dr. Chris Holzapfel (Agriculture Research Foundation, Indian Head)

 

3.1.4 Improving canola establishment and uniformity across various soil-climatic zones of Western Canada

Objective: To determine the effect of various degrees of uniformity in plant stand on crop development, seed yield and quality of canola in various soil-climatic zones, and to evaluate the effect of seed vigour and straw management options on establishment and crop yield.

Research Team: Dr. Yantai Gan (AAFC Swift Current) – Principal Investigator; Dr. Randy Kutcher (AAFC Melfort); Dr. Eric Johnson (AAFC Scott); Drs. Bill May and Guy Lafond (AAFC Indian Head); Dr. Neil Harker (AAFC Lacombe); Dr. Byron Irvine (AAFC Brandon); Dr. Rob Gulden (University of Manitoba)

 

3.1.5 Farm gate investigation of best management practices in canola establishment and production systems

Objective: To conduct a comprehensive farm gate investigation of the best management practices producers have been using in canola production across the major canola production zones of western Canada.

Research Team: Dr. Yantai Gan (AAFC Swift Current) – Principal Investigator

 

3.1.6 Factors influencing canola emergence

Objective: To determine the impact of seeding speed, seeding depth and canola seed type on canola emergence.

Research Team: Dr. Neil Harker (AAFC Lacombe) – Principal Investigator; Dr. Bob Blackshaw (AAFC Lethbridge); Dr. Eric Johnson (AAFC Scott); Drs. Bill May and Guy Lafond (AAFC Indian Head); Dr. Elwin Smith (AAFC, Lethbridge)

Funded through the Canola/Flax Canadian Agri-Science Cluster, a joint initiative of AAFC and Canola Council of Canada

 

Theme 4 – Crop Nutrition

 

3.2.1 Improving nutrient management in canola and canola-based cropping systems

Objective: To improve the safety and effectiveness of seed-placed N, P and S by evaluating seedling damage, crop yield, and quality as affected by varying sources of conventional and enhanced efficiency fertilizers applied alone and in blends across a range of environments. To determine the effect of the preceding crop (flax, wheat or canola) on yield, nutrient response, and soil quality parameters (aggregation, microbial activity, penetration resistance) in the following canola or wheat crop. To determine the effect of various methods of S fertilizer management on quantity and quality of canola for biodiesel production.

Research Team: Dr. Cynthia Grant (AAFC Brandon) – Principal Investigator; Drs. Jeff Schoenau and Fran Walley (University of Saskatchewan); Drs. Jean Lafond and Denis Pageau (AAFC Normandin); Dr. Sukhdev Malhi (AAFC Melfort); Dr. Brian Beres (AAFC Lethbridge); Dr. Neil Harker (AAFC Lacombe); Dr. John Heard (MAFRI); Dr. Don Flaten (University of Manitoba); Dr. Tarlok Sahota (Thunder Bay Agricultural Research Center)

 

3.2.2 Enhancing nitrogen management for canola production: addressing field, spatial and temporal variability with in-crop variable rate applications of nitrogen fertilizer

Objective: To validate the refining N rate choices in canola using the delta-yield approach of Kachanoski (University of Alberta) for specific fields. To validate in-crop, variable rate applications of N using optical sensors in canola over a wide geographical area using on-farm field trials. To determine the implications of the repeated use of optical sensors over the same area relative to the current methods of N rate determinations on overall performance and risk management using detailed small plot research trials.

Research Team: Dr. Guy Lafond (AAFC Indian Head) – Principal Investigator; Dr. Byron Irvine (AAFC Brandon; Dr. Chris Holzapfel (Agriculture Research Foundation, Indian Head); Miles Dyck (University of Alberta)

 

3.2.3 Nitrogen dynamics

Objective: To determine fertilization and crop production practices that would reduce greenhouse gas (nitrous oxide) emissions while simultaneously attaining canola with high yield and quality.

Research Team: Dr. Bob Blackshaw (AAFC Lethbridge) – Principal Investigator; Dr. Xiying Hao (AAFC Lethbridge); Drs. Neil Harker and John O’Donovan (AAFC Lacombe); Dr. Eric Johnson (AAFC Scott); Dr. Randy Kutcher (AAFC Melfort)

 

3.2.4 Phosphorous fertilizer and canola oil analyses

Objective: To determine best application rates, timings, and formulations of phosphorus fertilizer for high quality canola oil production. With the recent increase in phosphorous prices, farmers are tempted to cut back on rates and depend on soil reserves to produce the canola crop. A better understanding of the implication of phosphorous management on canola yield and quality is needed.

Research Team: Dr. Cynthia Grant (AAFC Brandon) – Principal Investigator

 

Theme 5 – Crop Protection

 

3.3.1 Facilitating the delivery of practical sclerotinia stem rot risk forecasts based on improved assessment of canola petal infestation

Objective: To develop a rapid method of pathogen detection on flower petals and relate this to field incidence of sclerotinia and weather/crop modelling. To collaborate with private seed testing labs with Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) capabilities, universities, industry and provincial staff to deploy a commercially available test related to sclerotinia stem rot risk forecasts.

Research Team: Dr. Kelly Turkington (AAFC Lacombe) – Principal Investigator; Dr. Stephen Strelkov (University of Alberta); Dr. Gary Peng (AAFC Melfort); Dr. Bruce Gossen (AAFC Saskatoon); Dr. Debbie McLaren (AAFC Brandon); Dr. Khalid Rashid (AAFC Morden); Dr. Faye Dokken (SAF Regina); Dr. David Kaminski (MAFRI Carman); Dr. Jim Broatch (AARD Lacombe); Derwyn Hammond (CCC, Brandon)

 

3.3.2 Weather-based assessment of sclerotinia stem rot risk

Objective: To quantify the influence of fundamental weather factors on sclerotinia severity and correlate these factors to pathogen incidence in order to develop weather-based assessments of sclerotinia stem rot disease risk. Ultimately, the goal is improved efficiency and efficacy of disease control methods while enhancing the predictability of the disease forecast model.

Research Team: Dr. Paul Bullock (University of Manitoba) – Principal Investigator; Andy Nadler (MAFRI, Carman)

 

3.3.3 Defining populations of the L. maculans pathogen in test sites used for canola blackleg resistance trials

Objective: To develop a tool for defining populations of the Leptosphaeria maculans pathogen at canola blackleg-resistance trial sites. To develop a set of single blackleg-resistance-gene substitution lines for B.napus canola. To evaluate the effectiveness of these lines for monitoring blackleg populations in the field and for testing L. maculans isolates in the laboratory.

Research Team: Dr. Hossein Borhan (AAFC Saskatoon) – Principal Investigator; Dr. Fengqun Yu (AAFC Saskatoon)

 

3.3.4 Mitigation of risk to canola from spring flea beetle injury

Objective: To quantify the risk of injury by flea beetles to prairie canola production by: a) Determining how environmental factors affect distribution, overwintering survival and spring emergence, flight, feeding levels, oviposition and reproduction of the two principal crucifer-feeding flea beetle species. b) Investigating conditions and reasons for seed treatment failures.

Research Team: Dr. Julie Soroka (AAFC Saskatoon) – Principal Investigator; Dr. Owen Olfert (AAFC Saskatoon); Jennifer Otani (AAFC Beaverlodge); Dr. John Gavloski (MAFRI Carmen); Dr. Lloyd Dosdall (University of Alberta); Drs. Chrystel Olivier and Bob Elliott (AAFC Saskatoon)

 

Theme 6 – Harvest Management

 

3.4.1 Evaluation of on-farm harvest losses in canola across Western Canada

Objective: To quantify on-farm canola yield losses and to understand the contributing factors.

Research Team: Dr. Robert Gulden (University of Manitoba) – Principal Investigator; Dr. Neil Harker (AAFC Lacombe); Dr. Steve Shirtliffe (University of Saskatchewan); Dr. Linda Hall (University of Alberta)

 

3.4.2 Developing methods to estimate pod drop and pod shatter in canola

Objective: To develop a quantitative or semi-quantitative method for easy and reliable estimation of pod drop and pod shatter in a maturing canola stand.

Research Team: Robert Gulden (University of Manitoba) – Principal Investigator

 

Theme 7 - Storage Management

 

3.5.1 Storage and handling characteristics of new varieties of high oil content canola

Objective: To develop safe storage guidelines for high oil content canola cultivars. This project will help to store the new high oil content canola varieties in a safe and efficient manner, preventing spoilage.

Research Team: Dr. Digvir Jayas (University of Manitoba) – Principal Investigator; Dr. Noel White (AAFC Winnipeg); Dr. Fuji Jian and Chelladurai Vellaichamy (University of Manitoba)

 

3.5.2 Feasibility of bag storage system for canola under prairie conditions

Objective: To quantify the changes in seed quality of canola during bag storage. This study will give detailed information about the feasibility of using harvest bags to store canola in the prairie regions, examining both high and lower oil content varieties.

Research Team: Dr. Digvir Jayas (University of Manitoba) – Principal Investigator; Dr. Noel White (AAFC Winnipeg); Dr. Fuji Jian and Chelladurai Vellaichamy (University of Manitoba)

 

Theme 8 – Integrated Crop Management

 

3.6.1 Integrated crop management systems for wild oat control

Objective: To determine innovative agronomic practices for superior wild oat control in field crops in Canada.

Research Team: Dr. Neil Harker (AAFC, Lacombe) – Principal Investigator; Drs. Kelly Turkington and Vern Baron (AAFC Lacombe); Drs. Bob Blackshaw, Newton Lupwayi and Elwin Smith (AAFC Lethbridge); Dr. Eric Johnson (AAFC Scott); Dr. Denis Pageau (AAFC Normandin); Dr. Linda Hall (University of Alberta); Dr. Steve Shirtliffe (University of Saskatchewan); Dr. Rob Gulden (University of Manitoba); Dr. John Rowsell (University of Guelph)

 

3.6.2 Improved integrated crop management with beneficial insects

Objective: To determine aspects of the biology of Diadegma insulare in canola in Western Canada with a focus on its role as a parasitoid for diamondback moth. The information gained will be utilized to train agronomists and farmers to monitor and sample crops for this insect and so reduce insecticide use where possible.

Research Team: Dr. Lloyd Dosdall (University of Alberta) – Principal Investigator; Drs. Owen Olfert and Julie Soroka (AAFC Saskatoon); Dr. Neil Harker (AAFC Lacombe)

 

3.6.3 Input study and recovery

Objective: To determine how many years it takes to recover from zero and 50% fertilizer and herbicide inputs.

Research Team: Dr. Neil Harker (AAFC Lacombe) – Principal Investigator; Drs. Bob Blackshaw and Elwin Smith (AAFC Lethbridge); Dr. Eric Johnson (AAFC Scott); Dr. Randy Kutcher (AAFC Melfort); Dr. John O’Donovan (AAFC Lacombe)

 

3.6.4 Legumes before canola

Objective: To determine the agronomic and economic merits of growing legume crops in the year preceding canola to reduce the amount of fertilizer required in canola production.

Research Team: Dr. John O’Donovan (AAFC Lacombe) – Principal Investigator; Drs. Bob Blackshaw, Newton Lupwayi and Elwin Smith (AAFC Lethbridge); Drs. Cynthia Grant and Byron Irvine (AAFC Brandon); Drs. Kelly Turkington and Neil Harker (AAFC Lacombe); Dr. Eric Johnson (AAFC Scott); Dr. Randy Kutcher (AAFC Melfort); Drs. Bill May and Guy Lafond (AAFC Indian Head); Dr. Yantai Gan (AAFC Swift Current)

 

Theme 9 - Sustainability

 

3.7.1 Determining arthropod biodiversity in canola cropping systems as a key to improved sustainability of production

Objective: This project will develop strategic foundation information on the biodiversity of arthropods in canola agro-ecosystems. The ultimate goal is to develop a new database of information on arthropod biodiversity in genetically modified and conventional cropping systems that can assist other realms of canola integrated crop management research for improving sustainability of canola cropping systems.

Research Team: Dr. Lloyd Dosdall (University of Alberta) – Principal Investigator; Dr. Hector Carcamo (AAFC Lethbridge); Dr. John Spence (University of Alberta); Dr. Jim Broatch (AARD Lacombe)

 

3.7.2 Economic profitability and sustainability of canola production systems in Western Canada

Objective: The objective of the proposed economic analyses is to evaluate canola production systems, primarily at the farm-level, to determine profitability of systems, economic trade-offs within the systems, and associated financial risk. Three studies will include: input study (initiate 2010), frequency of canola in rotation (initiate 2010), and canola emergence (initiate 2011). The analyses will integrate physical production factors with profitability, providing producers and the industry with economic information on which to make better production decisions and increase profitability.

Research Team: Dr. Elwin Smith (AAFC Lethbridge) – Principal Investigator; Dr. Scott Jeffrey (University of Alberta); Dr. Danny LeRoy (University of Lethbridge); Dr. Neil Harker and John O’Donovan (AAFC Lacombe); Dr. Stewart Brandt and Eric Johnson (AAFC Scott); Dr. Bob Blackshaw (AAFC Lethbridge); Dr. Randy Kutcher (AAFC Melfort)

 

3.7.3 The environmental footprint of canola and canola-based products

Objective: To determine the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of primary canola production through intensive field measurements and use of survey data of canola production practices and marketing. To calculate the GHG life-cycle of canola seed and key canola based products of canola meal, canola oil, and biodiesel from canola. To develop relative assessments of environmental impact of canola-based products with respect to potentially competing products.

Research Team: Dr. Vern Baron (AAFC, Lacombe) – Principal Investigator; Dr. Neil Harker (AAFC, Lacombe); Dr. Brian McConkey (AAFC, Swift Current); Dr. Reynald Lemke (AAFC, Saskatoon)

 

3.7.4 Evaluation of adaptability and ecological performance of Brassica juncea canola in diverse growing environments

Objective: To evaluate the adaptability of Brassica juncea canola in various environments across Western Canada, ranging from the drier, hotter areas of southwest Saskatchewan and southeast Alberta to more humid, central prairies, and expand to high-yielding areas of south Manitoba.

Research Team: Dr. Yantai Gan (AAFC, Swift Current) – Principal Investigator; Dr. Eric Johnson (AAFC, Scott); Dr. Cecil Vera (AAFC, Melfort); Drs. Bill May and Guy Lafond (AAFC, Indian Head); Dr. Bob Blackshaw (AAFC, Lethbridge)

 

3.7.5 Exploring the ecological impact of canola-inclusive cropping systems in Western Canada

Objective: To identify weed species associated with canola production and determine if shifts in species abundance and community composition have occurred over time in farmer fields. To evaluate the effects of management practices on weed species richness and diversity. To assess the impact of increased rotational frequency of canola on weed community composition and population shifts.

Research Team: Dr. Christian Willenborg (University of Alberta) – Principal Investigator; Julia Leeson (AAFC, Saskatoon); Dr. Neil Harker (AAFC, Lacombe); Dr. Bob Blackshaw (AAFC, Lethbridge); Dr. Eric Johnson (AAFC, Scott)

 

3.7.6 Consistent and environmentally sound canola production

Objective: To determine best management practices for consistent and environmentally sound production of high quality canola for the oil and meal markets.

Research Team: Dr. Bob Blackshaw (AAFC Lethbridge) – Principal Investigator; Dr. Neil Harker (AAFC Lacombe); Drs. Hector Carcamo, Newton Lupwayi, Xiying Hao, Elwin Smith and Bernie Hill (AAFC Lethbridge); Drs. John O’Donovan and Kelly Turkington (AAFC Lacombe); Drs. Eric Johnson and Stewart Brandt (AAFC Scott); Dr. Kevin Falk (AAFC Saskatoon); Dr. Randy Kutcher (AAFC Melfort)

 

3.7.7 Canola biodiesel sustainability

Objective: To enhance on-going biodiesel studies (ABIP) and conduct more detailed oil profile and biodiesel sample analyses in long-term canola rotation studies.

Research Team: Dr. Neil Harker (AAFC Lacombe) – Principal Investigator; Drs. John O’Donovan and Kelly Turkington (AAFC Lacombe); Drs. Bob Blackshaw, Newton Lupwayi and Elwin Smith (AAFC Lethbridge); Dr. Eric Johnson (AAFC Scott); Dr. Byron Irvine (AAFC Brandon); Dr. Yantai Gan (AAFC Swift Current); Dr. Randy Kutcher (AAFC Melfort)

 

3.7.8 Detection, surveillance and management of weed, insect and disease pests that threaten the economic viability of crop production and the environmental health of prairie agro-ecosystems

Objective: To develop & implement field surveillance technologies and laboratory assays for weeds, insects and plant diseases. To develop novel forecast & risk assessment technologies. To determine ecological, biological, climatological and crop management relationships that influence pest status. To develop new alternative integrated control and mitigation tactics.

Research Team: Dr. Owen Olfert (AAFC Saskatoon) – Principal Investigator; Dr. Hector Carcamo (AAFC Lethbridge); Dr. Kelly Turkington (AAFC Lacombe); Jennifer Otani (AAFC Beaverlodge); Dr. Bob Elliott, Dr. Julie Soroka, Dr. Chrystel Olivier and Julia Leeson (AAFC Saskatoon); Dr. Randy Kutcher (AAFC Melfort); Dr. Debbie McLaren (AAFC Brandon)

 

3.7.9 Top Canola Grower survey

Objective: To measure the impact of the Canola/Flax Agri-Science Cluster research projects and communication efforts on growers’ crop production practices, behaviours and knowledge. The initial assessment will be used as the baseline measure and provide insight into the specific messages that the Canola Council of Canada needs to communicate to canola growers. Follow-up measurement would then determine the extent to which production practices have improved as a result of the Canola Council’s research projects and extension efforts. To establish the production practices that result in top yields and characterize a ‘Top Canola Grower.’

Research Team: Dr. Elwin Smith (AAFC, Lethbridge) – Principal Investigator; Dr. Richard Carew (AAFC Summerland)

 

SaskCanola – Developing Innovative Agri-Products (DIAP)

 

Activity 1: Development of sclerotinia resistant Brassica napus lines and molecular markers for marker-assisted breeding.

Objective: The long term objective is to provide the canola industry with resistance genes and molecular markers linked to resistance for developing stem rot resistant canola. In the short term, the objectives are: 1) To develop molecular markers linked to sclerotinia resistance in new B. napus accessions recently identified in the PGRC collection; 2) To identify genes associated with resistance to sclerotinia stem rot resistance in a Chinese B. napus cultivar (ZhongYou 821); 3) To assess the genetic and pathogenic variation of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum isolates on the Canadian prairies.

Research Team: Drs. Lone Buchwaldt, Dwayne Hegedus and Isobel Parkin, (AAFC Saskatoon)

 

Activity 2: Improving the durability of resistance to blackleg in Brassica napus using the novel LepR4 gene

Objective: The overall objective is to provide canola breeders with canola donor lines containing the LepR4, LepR5 and LepR6 blackleg resistance genes, genetic map locations for each gene and molecular markers linked to each gene for marker-assisted selection in advanced canola breeding material.

Research Team: Dr. Derek Lydiate (AAFC Saskatoon)

 

Activity 3: Transfer of pod shatter resistance from yellow seeded B. napus and B. juncea to canola.

Objective: This study is focusing on the genetic control and field analysis of pod shatter in yellow seeded Brassica napus and Brassica juncea in an attempt to improve shatter resistance in conventional canola.

Research Team: Vicky Roslinsky, Drs. Sally Vail and Kevin Falk (AAFC Saskatoon)

 

Activity 4: Development of molecular genetic resources for Camelina sativa an alternative oilseed for the Prairies.

Objective: The overall objective of this activity is to provide resources for breeders to expedite the selection process and facilitate the development of Camelina sativa as an alternative oilseed for the bio-products industry and as a viable choice for producers on the Prairies.

Research Team: Drs. Isobel Parkin, Kevin Falk and Richard Gugel (AAFC Saskatoon)

 

 

GROWING FORWARD 2 (2013-2018)

Canola Agri-Science Cluster: Partnership for an Innovative and Competitive Industry

 

Theme 1 – Oil Nutrition

 

1.1 Canola Oil Multi-Centre Intervention Trial (COMIT II)

Objective: To examine the health benefits of dietary canola oils on body composition, specifically on android fat, and weight management. COMIT II will also include analysis of fatty acid ethanolamides (FAEs) to elucidate the mechanisms by which canola oil may be modifying body composition. Measurement of endothelial function, inflammatory, adiposity, and insulin sensitivity biomarkers will be done to determine the positive health impact of the changes in body composition achieved through canola oil consumption.

Research Team: Dr. Peter Jones (University of Manitoba) – Principal Investigator, Dr. David Jenkins (University of Toronto), Dr. Benoît Lamarche( Laval University), Drs. Penny-Kris-Etherton and Sheila West (Penn State ), Dr. Todd Rideout (University at Buffalo), Dr. Carla Taylor and Peter Zahradka (Canadian Centre for Agri-food Research in Health and Medicine)

 

1.2 Canola Oil Enriched Mediterranean Type Weight Loss Diet in Type 2 Diabetes

Objective: To assess whether a Mediterranean-type weight-loss diet, enriched with canola oil, high in plant protein, and low in carbohydrates will produce blood sugar control, reduce coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors and maximize weight loss, better than conventional higher carbohydrate diets in overweight diabetic patients.

Research Team: Drs. David Jenkins and Cyril Kendall (University of Toronto), Dr. Peter Jones (University of Manitoba), Dr. Benoît Lamarche (Laval University)

 

Theme 2 – Meal Nutrition

 

2.1 Maximizing Use of Canola Meal in Dairy Diets

Objective: To better understand how the protein and fibre profile of canola meal is utilized by the cow in an effort to understand the mechanism by which dairy cows fed canola meal consistently produce more milk than cows fed other protein sources.

Research Team: Drs. Hélène Lapierre and Daniel Ouellet (AAFC Sherbrooke) Dr. Tim Mutsvangwa (University of Saskatchewan ), Drs. Glen Broderick and Antonio Faciola (University of Wisconsin-Madison and University of Nevada-Reno), Dr. Kenneth Kalscheur (South Dakota State University), Dr. Peter Robinson (Cloverdale Dairy)

 

2.2 High Inclusion Levels of Regular and High Energy Canola Meal in Monogastric Rations

Objective: To address the issues associated with high canola meal feed inclusion levels and to demonstrate that canola meal can effectively be used at very high inclusion levels in swine and poultry feeds.

Research Team: Drs. Ruurd Zjilstra and Eduardo Beltranena (University of Alberta), Drs. Bogdan Slominski and Martin Nyachoti (University of Manitoba)

 

2.3 Canola Meal Quality Survey

Objective: To characterize nutritional differences in canola meal received from various Canadian crushing plants and determine the impact that these differences on diet formulation for all livestock species. Continued sampling and analysis over a 5 year period will create a strong profile of nutrient composition of products between and with processing facilities. Results of the analysis may determine potential for development or marketability of products with higher value for monogastric or ruminant species.

Research Team: Dr. Bogdan Slominski (University of Manitoba ), Drs. Glen Broderick and Antonio Faciola (University of Wisconsin-Madison and University of Nevada-Reno)

 

2.4 Canola Meal Processing

Objective: To develop and optimize methodology to produce protein- and fiber-enriched fractions from defatted canola meals by using fine milling, air-classification technology in a response-surface model experimental design. Work will be done to characterize the structure and functional properties of thermoplastic protein with the end goal of developing a bioplastic film from protein-enriched canola defatted meal fraction.

Research Team: Dr. Yachaun Zhang (Richardson Centre for Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals)

 

Theme 3 – Canola Health & Integrated Pest Management

 

3.1 Characterization and development of new resistant sources for sustainable management of clubroot in canola

Objective: The study will investigate resistance mechanisms with selected clubroot resistance (CR) genes based on transcriptional, proteomic, phenotypical, and biochemical analyses, develop segregating populations for mapping of clubroot resistance genes, develop robust markers tightly linked to the CR genes or from the gene it-self for marker-assisted selection (MAS), pyramid different resistance genes for the development of elite canola B. napus lines, and assess clubroot resistance and other agronomic and seed quality traits under varying field conditions.

Research Team: Drs. Gary Peng – Principal Investigator, Sally Vail, Kevin Falk, and Fengqun Yu (AAFC Saskatoon), Dr. Genyi Li (University of Manitoba), Dr. Habibur Rahman (University of Alberta)

 

3.2 The host-pathogen interaction of Plasmodiophora brassicae and canola

Objective: This research aims to fully understand the pathogenic and molecular diversity of P. brassicae populations, mechanisms of pathogenicity, infection processes, and the role of primary and secondary pathogen zoospores in disease development. The proposed work will build on the major advances achieved under the Clubroot Risk Mitigation Initiative and related projects, and will provide the information needed to help focus resistance breeding efforts and enable the knowledge-based management of clubroot in canola.

Research Team: Drs. Sheau-Fang Hwang – Principal Investigator (Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development), Dr. Stephen Strelkov (University of Alberta), Drs. Bruce Gossen and Hossein Borhan (AAFC Saskatoon), Dr. Mary Ruth McDonald (University of Guelph), Dr. Peta Bonham-Smith (University of Saskatchewan)

 

3.3 Management of clubroot in a dynamic environment

Objective: This research aims to continue to provide the tools and information necessary to successfully manage clubroot in western Canada, by answering a number of important questions: 1) can soil fumigants be used economically and effectively to eradicate localized clubroot infestations, thereby slowing disease spread and preventing clubroot establishment in new areas; 2) what impact will cropping rotations that include clubroot-resistant canola cultivars have on pathogen population dynamics in the soil and the subsequent impact on yield?; and 3) what are the optimal practical strategies for disinfesting agricultural and industrial equipment that has been contaminated with clubroot-infected plant material and/or soil containing spores.

Research Team: Drs. Sheau-Fang Hwang – Principal Investigator, Ron Howard, Mike Harding (Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development), Dr. Stephen Strelkov (University of Alberta), Drs. Bruce Gossen and Gary Peng (AAFC Saskatoon) Dr. Mary Ruth McDonald (University of Guelph ), Denis Pageau (AAFC Normandin)

 

3.4 Clubroot surveillance and epidemiology: Staying ahead of an important canola issue

Objective: This research aims to provide the canola industry with up to date information on clubroot prevalence and spread in the prairie region. This information will help to evaluate the rates of pathogen dissemination and will help to guide management approaches. Critical information on pathotype composition and the performance of clubroot-resistant varieties will also be made available and will help in resistance breeding and stewardship efforts.

Research Team: Dr. Stephen Strelkov – Principal Investigator (University of Alberta), Drs. Sheau-Fang Hwang and Mike Harding (Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development), Dr. Bruce Gossen, (AAFC Saskatoon), Dr. Debra McLaren (AAFC Brandon), (Dr. Kelly Turkington (AAFC Lacombe)

 

3.5 Aster yellows and Swede midge – new threats to prairie canola production

Objective: The objectives of this project are to determine the extent of infestation, evaluate the yield losses, develop economic thresholds and forecast warnings, and identify resistant canola lines for two canola pests increasing in severity on the prairies - aster yellows and swede midge. The project will generate knowledge of factors influencing biology of the pests in canola, provide the canola industry with means of assessing the economic impact, appropriate management strategies, and tools for forecast potential yield losses, and help to develop or identify aster yellows-resistant cultivars in collaboration with breeders.

Research Team: Drs. Chrystel Olivier – Principal Investigator, Julie Soroka and Owen Olfert (AAFC Saskatoon) Scott Hartley (Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture,) Scott Meers (Alberta Agriculture, Food and Rural Development), Dr. Rebecca H. Hallett (University of Guelph ), Dr. John Gavloski (Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development ), Jennifer Otani (AAFC Beaverlodge)

 

3.6 Development of pest management decision-making protocols for the Swede midge in canola

Objective: This research will contribute to the development of effective integrated pest management practices for Swede midge in canola through the following specific objectives: 1) to evaluate insecticide efficacy and timing of insecticide applications for reducing swede midge damage in spring canola; 2) to evaluate the use of pheromone-based action thresholds in determining the timing of insecticide applications against the swede midge. 3) to develop decision-making protocols for the timing of insecticide applications against the swede midge, based on crop stage and/or pheromone-based action thresholds.

Research Team: Dr. Rebecca H. Hallett – Principal Investigator (University of Guelph), Julie Soroka (AAFC Saskatoon)

 

3.7 Improved integrated crop management with beneficial insects

Objective: This study will determine the extent of the biological control complex on diamondback moth on the prairies. Other goals include conducting phylogenetic analysis of diamondback moths collected from different prairie locations and from source areas to determine if overwintering is occurring in Canada; clarifying cues used by D. insulare and diamondback moth in host-seeking and host acceptance; and developing climate models to predict the responses of both insects to irregular patterns of global climatic change. A Dymex model will be developed to predict the responses of both insects to irregular patterns of global climatic change.

Research Team: Drs. Julie Soroka and Owen Olfert (AAFC Saskatoon), Dr. Lloyd Dosdall (University of Alberta)

 

Theme 4 – Canola Yield & Quality Optimization

 

4.1 Seed size and seeding rate effects on canola yield and quality.

Objective: This study will investigate the influence of seed size on seedling emergence proportion, and canola yield and quality. This study will further investigate influence of seed size on seeding rate as well as size x rate interactions on seedling emergence and canola yield and quality. The results of this research will provide canola growers with knowledge that will assist them in making seeding rate decisions related to maintaining yield under stressful abiotic (drought, frost, flooding, hail, etc.) and biotic (weeds, insects, disease) conditions common in western Canada.

Research Team: Drs. K. Neil Harker – Principal Investigator and John O’Donovan (AAFC Lacombe), Dr. Gary Peng (AAFC Saskatoon), Dr. Kabal Gill (Smoky Applied Research & Demonstration Association), Dr. Chris Willenborg (University of Saskatchewan), Dr. Rob Gulden (University of Manitoba), Drs. Robert Blackshaw and Elwin Smith (AAFC Lethbridge), Dr. Eric Johnson (AAFC Scott), Dr. Ramona Mohr (AAFC Brandon), Dr. Gary Peng (AAFC Melfort)

 

4.3 Variable N fertility management of canola at the field scale, based on analysis of yield maps and spatial and statistical variability of soil test N and P

Objective: This study will investigate:

(i) Whether the variable rate N management based on management zones derived from a temporal series of yield maps increase canola yield in areas with consistently high production and low variability;

(ii) Economic return and efficiency of fertilizer use from variable rate management of N;

(iii) Relationship between the spatial and statistical variability of canola yield and soil test N and P at the field scale;

(iv) Variability related to current soil test recommendations; and

(v) Digital elevation, landform and remote sensing data correlated with canola yield.

Research Team: Drs. Alan Moulin, Principal Investigator and Mohammad Khakbazan (AAFC Brandon), Rejean Picard (Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Initiatives), Steve Sager (AAFC Morden) Don Cruickshank (Deerwood Soil and Water Management Association), Ken Coles (Farming Smarter), Dr. Stu Brandt (Northeast Agriculture Research Foundation)

 

4.4 Investigating tolerance of canola genotypes to heat and drought stresses, and root traits estimation by electrical capacitance

Objective: This study aims (i) to develop an electrical capacitance method for estimating canola root traits and root phenotyping, (ii) to assess the relationships between capacitance-estimated root traits and canola yield and seed quality traits, (iii) to identify critical period of canola genotypes sensitive to heat stress and the critical temperatures causing flower abortion, and (iv) to identify usable traits for selection of canola genotypes with better tolerance to heat and drought stresses.

Research Team: Dr. Bao-Luo Ma – Principal Investigator (AAFC-ECORC), Dr. Rob Duncan (University of Manitoba )

 

4.7 Feasibility of bag storage system for canola storage system for canola storage under Prairie conditions (Extension GF1-3.5.2)

Objective: This study is a continuation from Growing Forward 1 and will develop guidelines and recommendations of canola storage inside silo bags under Western Canadian prairie conditions.

Research Team: Drs. Digvir Jayas – Principal Investigator, and Fuji Jian (University of Manitoba), Dr. Noel White (AAFC Winnipeg)

 

4.8 On-Farm Canola Storage in Large Bins

Objective: The primary objective of this project is to determine whether existing recommendations for safe canola storage developed 20-30 years ago are still the same when the average bin size in the prairies has increased to 25,000 bu. The project will consider the effect of peaked vs. level grain in the bins as an initial phase.

Research Team: Lorne Grieger (Prairie Agricultural Machinery Institute)

 

Theme 5 - Integrated Crop Management & Sustainability of Canola Production

 

5.1 Canola sustainability - risk mitigation

Objective: This research will determine if some new strategies can maintain the lower yield plateau or even reverse the yield decline consistently observed in continuous canola. Practices that may mitigate or even reverse yield decline in continuous canola include: extra nitrogen as ESN, higher seeding rates, enhanced seed treatments, chaff removal to remove autoallelopathy threat, and specific combinations of those treatments.

Research Team: Drs. K. Neil Harker – Principal Investigator and John O’Donovan (AAFC Lacombe), Drs. Robert Blackshaw, Elwin Smith, and Newton Lupwayi (AAFC Lethbridge) Dr. Ramona Mohr (AAFC Brandon), Dr. Kelly Turkington (AAFC Lacombe)

 

5.2 Canola rotation studies - canola, cereal (corn), soy (oilseed)

Objective: The objectives of this study are to define the effect of canola on other crops (wheat/corn/soybean) in the rotation and the effects of those crops on canola performance across eastern Canada, to calculate the economic benefit of growing canola as well as nutrient utilization efficiency and carbon footprints in different cropping systems through the collection of soil, crop growth, yield and tissue N concentration data, to investigate major diseases and insects of canola production in different cropping systems, and to identify and establish a sustainable cropping system for canola production in eastern Canada.

Research Team: Dr. Claude Caldwell – Principal Investigator, and Doug McDonald (Dalhousie University), Dr. Donald Smith (McGill University) Drs. Bao-Luo Ma and Peter Masson (AAFC-ECORC)

 

5.4 The environmental footprint of canola and canola-based products (extension of GF1-3.7.3)

Objective: This project has two components: 1. Life cycle assessment of “on farm” canola production as affected by management change. 2. Determination of an “on farm” carbon footprint for canola in a high yield and input region (Lacombe, AB).

Research Team: Drs. Vern Baron – Principal Investigator, Neil Harker and John O’Donovan (AAFC Lacombe) Brian McConkey (AAFC Swift Current), AAFC Indian Head (Drs. Reynald Lemke and Guy Lafond)

 

5.5 Economic profitability and sustainability of canola project (extension of GF1-3.7.2)

Objective: The objective of this study is to assess the degree to which environmental stewardship activities (e.g., adoption of BMPs) affects efficiency of canola production in Western Canada.

Research Team: Dr. Scott Jeffrey – Principal Investigator) (University of Alberta), Dr. Elwin Smith (AAFC Lethbridge)

 

Theme 6 - Canola Supply Surveillance & Forecasting

 

6.1 Operational models to forecast canola growth stage, Sclerotinia risk, and yield in Western Canada.

Objective: This study (1) will develop and validate a canola phenology model to identify and forecast key development stages of the crop, (2) a weather-based sclerotinia stem rot (SSR) risk model to aid producers with fungicide treatment decisions and (3) a yield model to forecast canola production at local and regional scales.

Research Team: Dr. Rishi Burlakoti – Principal Investigator and Andy Nadler (Weather INnovations), Dr. Paul Bullock (University of Manitoba), Dr. Kelly Turkington (AAFC Lacombe), Dr. Aston Chipanshi (AAFC Regina), Dr. Nathaniel Newlands (AAFC Lethbridge)

 

Theme 7 - Science Cluster Tech Transfer

 

7.1 Canola Research Hub: Top Science for the Bottom Line

  • Barb Chabih (Canola Council of Canada)

 

AIP – P032 Canola Disease Management Tools for the Prairies - Blackleg and Sclerotinia

Activity 2: Improving canola resistance against blackleg disease through incorporation of novel resistance genes sourced from B. napus, B. rapa and B. oleracea.

Objective: To identify new major resistance genes for blackleg disease through the phenotypic screening of 500 accessions of Brassica napus, B. rapa and B. oleracea with a differential set of Leptosphaeria maculans isolates.

Principal Investigator: Dr. M. Hossein Borhan (AAFC Saskatoon)

 

Activity 3 - Identifying novel resistance genes from canola relatives and developing canola germplasm with multiple resistance genes sourced from B. nigra, B. juncea, and B. carinata.

Objective: to use cloned blackleg resistance genes (1) to identify the effective resistance genes, (2) to monitor the changing of pathogen isolates in canola fields, (3) to guide pyramiding effective resistance genes in the development of canola cultivars, (4) to guide the deployment of canola cultivars with various blackleg resistance genes; and (5) to identify novel blackleg resistance genes in canola relative species.

Principal Investigators: Drs. Genyi Li and Dilantha Fernando (University of Manitoba)

 

Activity 4: Genome-wide association mapping of quantitative resistance against blackleg in Brassica napus.

Objective: (1) to identify tightly-associated genetic markers for controlling adult plant resistance to blackleg; and (2) define the underlying genetic architecture of this durable resistance to blackleg in B. napus.

Principal Investigator: Dr. M. Hossein Borhan (AAFC Saskatoon)

 

Activity 5: Transcriptomic analysis of the Leptosphaeria maculans- (blackleg-canola) interaction to identify resistance genes in canola and avirulence factors in L. maculans.

Objective: (1) to identify effectors and evaluate the comparative transcriptomic response of susceptible and resistant canola lines to virulent isolates of Leptosphaeria maculans (blackleg); and (2) identify specific resistant genes in canola involved in the expression of an incompatible interaction with L. maculans

Principal Investigator: Dr. Richard Bélanger (Université Laval)

 

Activity 6 - Durable blackleg resistance stewardship through knowledge of blackleg pathogen population, resistance genes and crop sequence towards the development of a cultivar rotation program in the Prairie Provinces.

Objective: To analyze Avr gene diversity and frequency of different Avr genes in different farms.

Principal Investigator: Dr. Dilantha Fernando (University of Manitoba)

 

Activity 7: Investigating the Resistance (R-gene) durability of canola cultivars and emergence of virulent blackleg isolates in farmers’ fields.

Objective: (1) to assess which cultivar resistance genes are most durable to disease pressure and make recommendations on when and how often to rotate cultivars studied; and (2) to examine the potential of emergence of virulent isolates when a new cultivar without corresponding virulent isolates is introduced.

Principal Investigator: Dr. Dilantha Fernando (University of Manitoba)

 

Activity 8 - Rapid field diagnostics of the blackleg pathogen races through the identification of pathogen avirulence (Avr) genes and the development of Avr-specific markers.

Objective: to develop molecular markers as an efficient tool for genotyping and monitoring L. maculans populations in canola fields across Western Canada.

Principal Investigator: Dr. M. Hossein Borhan (AAFC Saskatoon)

 

Activity 9 - Development of a blackleg yield loss model and assessment of fungicide resistance in western Canadian populations of Leptosphaeria maculans.

Objective: (1) to develop a yield loss model to relate the severity of blackleg on canola with the corresponding yield losses; and (2) to evaluate representative populations of L. maculans from western Canada for the occurrence of fungicide resistance.

Principal Investigator: Dr. Stephen Strelkov (University of Alberta)

 

Activity 10 - Characterization of defense genes underlying quantitative resistance loci (QRL) to Sclerotinia stem rot in Asian Brassica napus and transfer of resistance to Canadian spring type canola.

Objective: (1) to identify molecular markers linked to sclerotinia resistance and identification of underlying defense genes; and (2) to transfer of sclerotinia resistance to elite open-pollinated spring type canola.

Principal Investigator: Dr. Lone Buchwaldt (AAFC Saskatoon)

 

Activity 11 - Resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum necrosis inducing proteins in canola.

Objective: (1) to identify proteins secreted by S. sclerotiorum that cause or contribute to necrosis; and (2) to develop a method to screen B. napus lines for resistance to their effects.

Principal Investigator: Dr. Dwayne Hegedus (AAFC Saskatoon)

 

In Pursuit of 52 by 2025 – AgriScience Project

 

2015.6 Identification and genetic mapping of Brassica napus for resistance to pathotype 5X of Plasmodiophora brassicae

Objective: To identify new sources of B. napus for resistance to pathotype 5X. To study the inheritance of clubroot resistance (CR) in the new sources of B. napus. To map CR genes genetically in the new sources of B. napus. To develop robust SNP markers tightly linked to the CR genes for use in marker assisted breeding and facilitate the rapid incorporation of multiple CR genes into elite canola breeding lines.

Research Team: Drs. Fengqun Yu -Principal Investigator, Gary Peng and Bruce Gossen (AAFC Saskatoon), Dr. Sheau-Fang Hwang (Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development), Dr. Stephen Strelkov (University of Alberta)

 

2015.12 Understanding the mechanisms for race-specific and non-specific resistance for effective use of cultivar resistance against blackleg of canola in Western Canada

Objective: The overall goal is to understand the mechanisms of blackleg resistance associated with specific and non-specific resistance genes in representative canola cultivars/germplasms to provide science-based guidelines for accurate assessment and optimal use of different types of host resistance against blackleg disease of canola in Western Canada.

Research Team: Drs. Gary Peng – Principal Investigator, Fengqun Yu, Linda McGregor, Xunjian Liu, Zhai Chun (AAFC Saskatoon), Drs. Chithra Karunakaran and Rachid Lahlali (Canadian Light Source)

 

2015.14 Characterization of the new strains of the clubroot pathogen in Alberta

Objective: The primary objective of this project is to mitigate the risk posed to the agricultural industry by the emergence of new strains of Plasmodiophora brassicae able to overcome the resistance in "clubroot resistant" canola. The project will identify and characterize the strains of P. brassicae that can overcome resistance and identify genetic resources that are not prone to this resistance breakdown. Molecular markers will be developed that can distinguish P. brassicae strains and, if possible, identify pathogen populations based on pathotype.

Research Team: Dr. Sheau-Fang Hwang - Principal investigator (Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development), Dr. Stephen Strelkov (University of Alberta)

 

2015.15 Using SNP markers to assess genetic variability of Plasmodiophora brassicae in Canada.

Objective: The objective of the project is to use assessment of genetic relatedness (based on SNP markers) to answer several important questions related to introduction of lines of P. brassicae that were pathogenic on canola onto the Canadian prairies. First, does this introduction represent a single event, or multiple introductions, and where did the introduction originate from? Second, is the pathogen population in Alberta as diverse as those studied elsewhere, and does this high / low diversity have implications for durability of resistance against this pathogen? Third, are the new virulent collections (colloquially referred to as 5X) genetically similar, and which pathogen lines are they derived from?

Research Team: Drs. Bruce Gossen – Principal Investigator, Fengqun Yu, and Gary Peng (AAFC Saskatoon), Dr. Stephen Strelkov (University of Alberta), Dr. Mary Ruth McDonald (University of Guelph)

 

2015.17 Integrated approaches for flea beetle control – Economic thresholds, prediction models, landscape effects and natural enemies

Objective: Our overall objective is to develop a holistic and sustainable approach to flea beetle control. The objectives are to: 1) develop descriptive economic thresholds for flea beetles 2) Identify the suite of natural enemies of flea beetles using innovative molecular methods 3) Define landscape characteristics that limit flea beetle populations and increase mortality of flea beetles by natural enemies; 4) develop models to predict flea beetle emergence and major seasonal activity based on abiotic environmental conditions (eg. temperature, precipitation, wind, soil temperature); and 5) Incorporate all these components into a comprehensive tool and set of management guidelines for canola producers.

Research Team: Dr. Alejandro Costamagna (University of Manitoba), Dr. Barb Sharanowski (University of Central Florida), Dr. John Gavlovski (Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development), Dr. Rishi Burlakoti and Andy Nadler (Weather Innovations), Dr. Hector Carcamo (AAFC Lethbridge), Jennifer Otani (AAFC Beaverlodge), Dr Tyler Wist (AAFC Saskatoon)

 

2015.27  To germinate or not to germinate?  -  Towards understanding the role dormancy plays in canola seed and seedling vigour and stand establishment

Objective: Objective:  The objectives of this research are to: i) Establish the relative degree of pod shatter susceptibility or resistance in commercial canola breeding lines or hybrids relative to a diverse set of spring Brassica napus (Bn) lines;  ii)  Define the regions of the spring Bn genome that contribute to both shatter tolerance and shatter susceptibility and investigate the underlying pod physiological structural and biochemistry contributors; iii)  Explore methodology for characterizing and quantifying in-field shattering, focusing on methods amenable for high-throughput analyses of large mapping or breeding populations.

Research Team: Dr. Sally Vail (AAFC Saskatoon), Dr. Isobel Parkin (AAFC Saskatoon), Steve Robinson (AAFC Saskatoon), Robert Gulden (University of Manitoba), Steve Shirtliffe (University of Manitoba)