• To evaluate a field, walk an X or W path across the field and note all plants that will survive in a 1/4 m2 (3 ft2) area every 20 paces. This should be 50 to 100 samples. Record an observation from each sample. Calculate the percentage of the field that has adequate plant recovery. The……
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  • Before making re-seed decisions consider the following: Take a close look. Get down, way down, at ground level and look for signs of recovery. A plant with a green, intact growing point can still continue to grow. A magnifying glass will help zero-in on the tiny plant parts. Scratch around and scrape back crop residue……
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  • There are reports of macronutrients and micronutrients being foliar applied to frosted, stalled crops to give the plants a boost. Canola Council of Canada agronomists are not aware of any scientific research to date here in western Canada that supports the economics of this practice. However, if growers do apply a foliar application, they should……
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  • Re-assess the maturity of the chosen variety. It may be getting too late to plant longer season varieties based on the frost-free period remaining. If necessary, ask a local retailer to suggest other suitable varieties for the area. Keep crop insurance deadlines in mind. The crop insurance seeding deadline for Saskatchewan is June 20. In……
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  • Canola fields with low plant densities are more vulnerable to losses from insects, weed competition and environmental stresses such as fall frosts. Crops with low plant densities need to be managed more intensely. More frequent and intensive scouting for pests (insects and weeds) is critical because any losses are more likely to reduce yield. Action……
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  • The decision to re-seed is not an easy one, especially this far into June. Ultimately it is the growing conditions for the remainder of the season that will determine if the decision to re-seed was correct. If you have made the decision to re-seed, leave a checkstrip, preferably in the centre of the field. This……
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  • Reports of cutworms continued this week across western Canada. Cutworm damage often appears as bare patches showing up across the field. Plants in these areas will be wilted or dead and have been chewed off below the soil surface. Generally the pale western and red-backed cutworms are of economic importance in canola on the Prairies.……
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  • While digging for cutworms, you may encounter other worms. Species in the enchytraeid family are pale white to grey, segmented worms and usually one to two cm (but can be up to five cm) in length. When magnified, these worms resemble earthworms. These creatures are beneficial insects that function in decaying organic matter and nutrient……
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  • Cabbage seedpod weevils have been reported in southern Alberta (Medicine Hat area). Owen Olfert, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada – Saskatoon, is about to roll out the prairie-wide monitoring program for this season and we will relay the results as the season progresses. Although it is too early in the season to begin control measures for……
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